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20121207
20121207
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
against his own people. the military is prepared to use poisen gas bombs, secretary of hillary clinton flew to dublin to hold a meeting with her russian counter part and u.n. enjoy to syria meeting to discuss how they would end the now 21-month long conflict in syria and how to move assad from power. and there's no sign they had to reverse the support, and today, a senior lawmaker says the syria government is now incapable of functioning properly. just before the meeting with the russian foreign minister, secretary clinton insisted that the united states and russia share common goals in the region. >> trying hard to work hard with russia to stop the bloodshed in syria and begin a political transition to a post asad future. the pressure against the regime in and around damascus seems to be increasing. lou: at home, leon pa net fa issuing the -- panetta issuing the sharpest warning yet. >> the president of the united states made it clear there will be consequences. there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using chemical weapons on their own people. lou:
revolutionary guard corps. hillary clinton a couple years ago said iran was edging close league to be in the military to peter should. i wonder when marina talks about this long history of abuse of political prisoners by the agents of that abuse had changed over this 20, 30 year span and whether the increased role has an impact on the human rights landscape. is the power of military know me making matters worse? >> thank you very much, ladies and gentlemen. and thanks to ftd for arranging a panel discussion about human rights. it's rather interesting that in the city in washington d.c., most panels about iran are about the nuclear program. that is almost nothing that the human rights program. the iranian audience in the reading public because it means you care about your own security. you care about the implications of the islamic republic coming into an armed state. what happens in iran does not really matter to washington. this is the signal washington has been sending to iran and i think this panel and ftd's initiative to make human rights issue a more important issue on agen
the increasing power and ubiquity of the islamic revolutionary guard corps and hillary clinton, a couple of years ago, said that iran was edging closer to being a military dictatorship. when marina talks about the long history of abuse of political prisoners, wonder whether the agents of that abuse have changed over these 20-30 years and whether the increased role of the irgc has an impact on the human rights landscape. has the power of the military and i ran things worse? >> thank you very much ladies and gentlemen and thanks for arranging this panel discussion about human rights. it is rather interesting that in this city, washington, d.c., most panels about iran are about the nuclear program. there's almost nothing about human rights. this sends a terrible signal to the iranian public. it means that you care about your own security. you care about the implications of the islamic republic becoming a nuclear-armed state but what happens in iran does not really matter to the washington elite. this is the signal washington has been sending to iran and i think this panel and the initiative to make
supporting same sex marriage, president clinton who signed defense of marriage act into law, he supports gay marriage, but the american public attitudes have changed. back in 2005, 35% thought same sex marriage should be recognized. now it is up to 53%. here is the question. do the justices, the nine justices, are they influenced by public opinion? >> you bet. they sure are. this is an issue that wouldn't even have been on the agenda had the public not changed so dramatically. let me just tell you a story from supreme court history. 1986, the first real significant gay rights case that the court ever had, the swing vote at the time was lewis powell. and he was in his chambers, said to his law clerk, you know, i don't think i ever met a homosexual. no justice would say that today. as it turned out, that law clerk himself was a gay man, although he didn't disclose it to the justice at the time. the world has changed so dramatically, the polls have changed. justice ruth ginsberg often talks about the reason she won as a lawyer all the women's rights cases in the 1970s is that the world had chan
committee following a leadership of chairman clinton. we are in a tight schedule and 5 like to call up senator kc. i would be remiss if i did not recognize the presence here today of lieutenant-colonel larry lerlach. he was commander of an amphibious unit in lebanon. in october of 1983 hezbollah terrorists drove two trucks and exploded the american and french marine barracks. he survived it, 241 american women did not. he is here today with us. we thank you so much for your service and honoring us. [applause] >> welcome again to the foundation for defense of democracy's annual washington forum. my name is kenneth schwartz. i have the pleasure of introducing distinguished public official robert kc, senior senator from the state of pennsylvania. you served since 2007 as chairman of near east and south asia subcommittee, senate foreign relations committee only in the first term. one can scarcely imagine a more challenging time, the past two years in the middle east have seen wars in international borders, collapse of regimes in decades and the rise of political movements that may yet turn
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)